Central Asia Policy Briefs

The OSCE Academy in Bishkek is welcoming proposals for its Central Asia Policy Briefs Series on topics related to comprehensive security and development in Central Asia. The topics may cover various facets of comprehensive security and development, including, but not limited to, socioeconomic determinants of security, identity-based conflicts, politics and religion, ethnopolitics, security organizations, economic development, international relations, the situation in Afghanistan and other neighboring states.

Central Asia Policy Briefs are intended to foster interaction among policy, expert, and scholarly communities. The policy briefs are published online in pdf format and are made available on the Academy’s website and Facebook page.  Submissions can be made in English or Russian. The Academy seeks in the future to make selected issues available in Central Asian languages as well. Submission guidelines can be downloaded here. Chicago style manuscript is used for the Policy Briefs; you can access guidelines here. The OSCE Academy offers an honorarium of 150 Euro per Policy Brief publication and provides with a peer review process, proofreading support, and further guidance. There is no submission deadline as we accept proposals on the rolling basis.

Academy Yearbook for Policy Analysis

Launched in 2018 Academy Yearbook for Policy Analysis includes selected works of researchers from the region and beyond, written over the past few years, and specifically edited and translated into Russian for this new collection. This first volume consists of three sections, combining articles on thematic areas. In the first section, the authors analyze the socio-economic challenges of different levels facing the countries of Central Asia. The second section is devoted to a comprehensive review of the dialogue between the citizen and the state. Articles from the third, final, part of the collection examine the current issues of security and international cooperation.

Language: Russian

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Latest Publications under the Central Asia Policy Briefs Series

 

Policy Brief No.48: The Role of Russia in the Central Asian Security Architecture

By Fabio Indeo Download

The Key points of the paper are:

• Russia considers the Eurasia region as an exclusive sphere of influence to protect from external interferences providing security by means of bilateral cooperation and multilateral institutions such as the CSTO. Within the CSTO framework, Moscow aims to play the role of regional security provider by means of joint military exercises, of the delivery of modern military equipment at Russian internal prices, of the presence of CSTO military bases in Central Asian republics as the Kant airbase in Kyrgyzstan and the Russian 201st Motor Rifle Division in Tajikistan.

• After 2014 Russia could have the great geopolitical opportunity to legitimate itself as the only security provider in Central Asia. Regional stability and security represent shared concerns of all actors involved and they should work together to contain and fight against destabilizing threats coming from Afghanistan.

• However, Russia’s invasion of Crimea and the explosive crisis with Ukraine have heavily damaged Russia’s image in Central Asia, spreading serious concerns about Russian integration project in the security (CSTO) and political-economic field (EEU). Furthermore, the Russian economy’s crisis - linked to low oil prices and the effect of the Western sanctions - have frozen Moscow’s pledged investments to upgrade military capacities in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, while the reiterated refusal of Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan to join CSTO (considering that Uzbekistan has voluntarily left the CSTO in 2012 for the second time) undermines the Russian project to realize a Central Asian security architecture under Moscow’s leadership.

Policy Brief No.47: Local Drivers of War in Afghanistan's Helmand Province

By Qayoom Suroush Download

The Key points of the paper are:

• Violence  and  war  in  Afghanistan’s  Helmand  province  have  turned  to  a  strategic  and long-term policy by stakeholders, as a result of which there have not been a comprehensive program for improving public services and reforming local institutions to benefit the population;
• Available indicators point to overall popularity of the Taliban insurgents in Helmand. In contrast to what has commonly been believed, however, it is not the Taliban’s political message and their narrative of Islamic Sharia that attracts local communities to their rule,    but the self-interest and economic benefits that entices the majority agrarian local population to support them;

• There are three important drivers of the conflict in Helmand—the strength and influence of local warlords, the factor of agricultural land rights, and the drug trade—together which they continue to keep the province as one of the most violent and insubordinate to central government authority in Afghanistan;

• The local population of Helmand both the elites and ordinary communities have reached an informal or undeclared alliance with the insurgent groups to maximize their interests. They use the alliance with insurgents as an instrument (a) to lobby for political power, and (b) to earn incomes and gain financial benefits from the drug trade and illicit economy.

Policy Brief No.46: The Effect of the EEU on Business Comminity in Kyrgyzstan (Russian language)

By Lidiya Chikalova Download

The Key points of the paper are:

The investment climate has chances for improvement, when the judicial and legal mechanisms for foreign funds will devlope and local investment market will have the precedents of successful cases.

The experience of entrepreneurs who invested in the economy of the Kyrgyz Republic, showed that there is no culture of foreign direct investment in the country and trade. In today's market there are no positive examples of establishing new partnerships with foreign donors.

The problem that Kyrgyzstan faces today is not a problem of accession to the EEA, but the economic growth and conditions for business development and attraction of investments. Low competitiveness of industrial goods is one of the main business tasks. After elimination obstacles preventing entrepreneurs from entering the market the positive changes can be expected.

Policy Brief No.45: KYRGYZSTAN AND THE EURASIAN ECONOMIC UNION-A PARTNERSHIP WITH OBSTACLES

By Ann-Sophie Gast Download

The Key points of the paper are:

• Two years and a half ago Kyrgyzstan joined the Eurasian Economic Union. The main reasons for accession were dependence on Russian and Kazakh markets as well as the large number of Kyrgyz labor migrants working in Russia and sending remittances home on a regular basis. Moreover, Russia offered an attractive package of compensations and concessions to make accession more attractive and facilitate the transition period.

• So far results are mixed. While FDI has increased and the situation of Kyrgyz labor migrants has improved, the desired economic boost and modernization have not materialized yet. Furthermore, overall export has declined and trade with China, Kyrgyzstan’s largest trading partner, went down. This is due to poor preparations on the Kyrgyz side, difficulties to implement the requirements of the Union, but also a general economic slow-down in the Eurasian region and a diplomatic conflict with Kazakhstan.

• To profit from Eurasian integration in the future, the Kyrgyz government has to invest more resources in the implementation of technical regulations and the establishment of laboratories. Moreover, it has to support small and medium-sized businesses in the difficult transit period. In the long run, the Kyrgyz economic model needs to be transformed and should no longer rely on re-export and remittances, but on its own production and labor force instead. The creation of jobs and the diversification of export structures are crucial in this regard.

• Last but not least, the Kyrgyz government should invest in the education and training of experts on Eurasian integration to be placed both at the domestic level as well as at the supranational level at the Eurasian Economic Commission in Moscow to lobby Kyrgyz interests more efficiently.

Policy Brief No.44: AFGHANISTAN’S MINERAL RESERVES CATASTROPHE/QUANDARY: HOPES AND FEARS CONCERNING THE DEVELOPMENT OF MINERAL RESERVES

By Mahdi Frough Download

 

Policy Brief No.43: TRANQUILITY OR TURBULENCE IN TASHKENT? UZBEKISTAN IN THE POST-KARIMOV ERA

By Charles J. Sullivan Download

 

Policy Brief No.42: RUSSIAN MEDIA DISCOURSES ON SYRIAN REFUGEES IN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIAN LABOUR MIGRANTS IN RUSSIA: RUSSIA FOR RUSSIANS, EUROPE FOR…?

By Rashid Gabdulhakov Download

 

Policy Brief No.41: RADICALIZATION AND VIOLENT EXTREMISM IN CENTRAL ASIA AND AFGHANISTAN

By Muhammad Idrees Download

 

Policy Brief No.40: EXTREMISM IN TERMS OF SYSTEMIC TRANSFORMATION IN CONTEMPORARY KYRGYZSTAN

By Elmira Toktosunova Download

 

Policy Brief No.39: FACTORS INFLUENCING FORMATION OF ELECTORAL OPINION IN THE KYRGYZ REPUBLIC

By Dmitrii Lazarenko Download

 

Policy Brief No.38: CONTEXTUALIZING THE ISSUE OF RETURNEES AND ANALYZING RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE APPLICABLE TO CENTRAL ASIA

By Chingiz Batyrbekov Download

 

Policy Brief No.37: FAMILY PLANNING TRAININGS FOR THE NEWLYWEDS IN TAJIKISTAN

By Madina Muratova Download

 

Policy Brief No.36: CLIMATE CHANGE AS A POLITICAL THREAT MULTIPLIER IN CENTRAL ASIA

By Lidiya Chikalova Download

 

Policy Brief No.35: LGBT IN KYRGYZSTAN: FROM ANTI-GAY PROPAGANDA BILL TO HATE CRIME?

By Sappho M. Bonheur Download

 

Policy Brief No.34: CORRUPTION IN UZBEK HIGHER EDUCATION: DETRIMENTAL IMPURITY FOR THE FUTURE 

By Albina Yun Download

 

Policy Brief No.33: INCLUSION OF SMALL FARMERS INTO PRODUCTION VALUE CHAINS THROUGH STRENGTHENING AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVES IN KAZAKHSTAN

By Gulaikhan Kubayeva Download

 

Policy Brief No.32: SECURITY OF THE CENTRAL ASIAN ENERGY SYSTEM: INSTITUTIONAL VERSUS STATE INTERESTS

By Farkhod Aminjonov Download

 

Policy Brief No.31: ADDRESSING THE DAESH THREAT IN THE CONTEXT OF CENTRAL ASIA 

By Belek Ibraev Download

 

Policy Brief No.30: SOCIALIZATION IN VIOLENCE AND THE POST-2014 APPROACH IN AFGHANISTAN

By Svetlana Dzardanova Download

 

Policy Brief No.29: REGIME SECURITY VERSUS HUMAN SECURITY: THE CASE OF AN UPRISING IN KYRGYZSTAN, 2010

By Almakan Orozobekova and Alexander Wolters Download

 

Policy Brief No.28: THE ETHNO-POLITICAL PROCESSES IN MODERN KYRGYZSTAN: ANALYSIS OF 2010-2015 YEARS

By Elmira Toktosunova (Russian version only) Download

 

Policy Brief No.27: TAJIKISTAN IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH: DEVELOPMENT DIPLOMACY, NONTRADITIONAL SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL PRESTIGE

By Jason E. Strakes Download

 

Policy Brief No.26: THE OSCE IN CENTRAL ASIA: VICTIM OF GEOPOLITICS OR PROMOTER OF DEMOCRACY? A VIEW FROM UZBEKISTAN

By Farkhod Tolipov Download
 

 

Policy Brief No.25: TAPI AND CASA-1000: WIN-WIN TRADE BETWEEN CENTRAL ASIA AND SOUTH ASIA

By Sayed Masood Sadat Download

 

Policy Brief No.24: ETHNIC MINORITIES’ POLITICAL MOBILIZATION: CASES OF UZBEKS AND PAMIRIS. FROM THE TAJIK CIVIL WAR TO THE 2012/2014 KHOROG EVENTS

By Azizzhon Berdykulov Download

 

Policy Brief No.23: STATE REGULATION OF RELIGION IN KAZAKHSTAN: RECONSIDERATION OF APPROACHES 

By Sergey Marinin Download

 

Policy Brief No.22: AFGHANISTAN'S GROWING ETHNIC AND LINGUISTIC DIVIDES: TIME TO ADDRESS THEM

By Arwin Rahi Download

 

Policy Brief No.21: LABOUR MIGRATION FROM CENTRAL ASIA TO RUSSIA: ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL IMPACT ON THE SOCIETIES OF KYRGYZSTAN, TAJIKISTAN, AND UZBEKISTAN

By Irina Malyuchenko Download

 

Policy Brief No.20: ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE EURASIAN ECONOMIC UNION ON CENTRAL ASIA

By Gulaikhan Kubayeva Download

 

Policy Brief No.19: THE EFFECTS OF THE UKRAINE CRISIS ON TAJIKISTAN

By Uguloy Mukhtorova Download

 

Policy Brief No.18: LESSONS OF THE OSCE POLICE ASSISTANCE IN CENTRAL ASIA WITH A CASE STUDY OF KYRGYZSTAN

By Reina Artur kyzy Download

 

Policy Brief No.17: CHINA AS SECURITY PROVIDER IN CENTRAL ASIA POST 2014: A REALISTIC PERSPECTIVE?

By Dr Fabio Indeo Download

 

Policy Brief No.16: MIGRANTS’ RE-ENTRY BANS TO THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION: THE TAJIK STORY

By Karolina Kluczewska Download

 

Policy Brief No.15: THE JUNE 2010 ‘EVENTS’ FOUR YEARS ON: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

By Franco Galdini Download

 

Policy Brief No.14: GEOGRAPHICAL ENCLAVES OF THE FERGHANA VALLEY: DO GOOD FENCES MAKE GOOD NEIGHBORS?

By Rashid Gabdulhakov Download

 

Policy Brief No.13: CENTRAL ASIA'S NATURAL GAS: THE PITFALLS OF ENERGY EXPORT DIVERSIFICATION

By Farkhod Aminjonov Download

 

Policy Brief No.12: AFGHANISTAN’S TRANSITION TOWARDS 2014: IMPLICATIONS FOR CENTRAL ASIA

By Said Reza Kazemi Download






 

Policy Brief No.11: IS THERE A VIABLE FUTURE FOR US POLICY IN CENTRAL ASIA?

By Dr. Roger Kangas Download

 

Policy Brief No.10: KHOROG MILITARY OPERATION AND MARTIAL STATUS OF THE TAJIKISTAN ARMED FORCES

By Faredun Hodizoda (Russian version only) Download

 

Policy Brief No.9: AFGHANISTAN: STATE, BOUNDARIES, AND THE THREATS OF PERPETUAL CONFLICT

By Elham Gharji Download

 

Policy Brief No.8: COOPERATION OF MASS MEDIA AND GOVERNMENT BODIES IN JALAL-ABAD

By Valentina Galitch (Russian version only)  Download

 

Policy Brief No.7: INSTABILITY IN TAJIKISTAN? THE ISLAMIC MOVEMENT OF UZBEKISTAN AND THE AFGHANISTAN FACTOR

By Christian Bleuer Download

 

Policy Brief No.6: THE ARAB SPRING: IMPLICATIONS FOR EUROPE-EURASIAN RELATIONS?

By Graeme P. Herd and Violetta Yan Download

 

Policy Brief No.5: TRANSIT AGREEMENTS, SECURITY COOPERATION AND AFGHANISTAN STABILIZATION

By Gregory Gleason Download

 

Policy Brief No.4: THE STATE AT ITS BORDERS: THE INTERNAL DIMENSIONS OF KYRGYZSTAN’S BORDER SECURITY

By Katarzyna Czerniecka Download

 

Policy Brief No.3: TRUST IN A TRADITIONAL, TOLERANT AND TRANSPARENT MULTI-LEVEL GAME? THE KAZAKHSTANI OSCE CHAIRMANSHIP 2010

By Anna Kreikemeyer Download

 

Policy Brief No.2: COMPARING INDIA'S AND CHINA'S APPROACHES IN CENTRAL ASIA

By Ajay Patnaik Download

 

Policy Brief No.1: RESURRECTING AN ENERGY TARIFF POLICY IN KYRGYZSTAN

By David Gullette Download

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